top of page

Moral Credential Effect: Definition, Examples and Effects

The moral credential effect is a psychological phenomenon in which people are more likely to trust and accept the opinions of someone who has previously taken a moral stance on an issue. This effect is based on the idea that people are more likely to trust someone who has already demonstrated their commitment to a moral cause.


Examples of the Moral Credential Effect


One example of the moral credential effect is when a person who has previously taken a stand against racism is more likely to be trusted and accepted when they make a statement about racism. Another example is when a person who has previously taken a stand against animal cruelty is more likely to be trusted and accepted when they make a statement about animal cruelty.


Effects of the Moral Credential Effect


The moral credential effect can have both positive and negative effects. On the positive side, it can help to create a more trusting and accepting environment, as people are more likely to trust and accept the opinions of someone who has already taken a moral stance on an issue. On the negative side, it can lead to a situation in which people are more likely to trust and accept the opinions of someone simply because they have taken a moral stance on an issue, regardless of the accuracy of their statements.


Do you want to expand your knowledge on this topic? Read our full in-depth article on cognitive biases.


Do you have extra 15 minutes today? Takeour fun and interactive quiz to learn which of 16 reasoning styles you use, your overall level of rationality, and what you can do now to improve your rationality skills.

Commentaires


bottom of page