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Bias Blind Spot: Definition, Examples and Effects

Bias blind spot is a cognitive bias that causes people to be unaware of their own biases. It is a phenomenon in which people are unable to recognize their own biases, even when they are aware of the biases of others. This can lead to a lack of self-awareness and an inability to recognize and address one’s own biases.


Definition: Bias blind spot is a cognitive bias that causes people to be unaware of their own biases. It is a phenomenon in which people are unable to recognize their own biases, even when they are aware of the biases of others.


Examples: One example of bias blind spot is when someone is aware of the gender bias in the workplace, but fails to recognize their own gender bias when hiring or promoting employees. Another example is when someone is aware of the racial bias in the criminal justice system, but fails to recognize their own racial bias when judging a person’s guilt or innocence.


Effects: The effects of bias blind spot can be far-reaching. It can lead to a lack of self-awareness and an inability to recognize and address one’s own biases. This can lead to a lack of empathy and understanding of others, as well as a lack of diversity and inclusion in the workplace. It can also lead to a lack of trust and respect between people of different backgrounds.


Do you want to expand your knowledge on this topic? Read our full in-depth article on cognitive biases.


Do you have extra 15 minutes today? Takeour fun and interactive quiz to learn which of 16 reasoning styles you use, your overall level of rationality, and what you can do now to improve your rationality skills.

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