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Herding Instinct: Definition, Examples and Effects

Herding instinct is a natural behavior that is seen in many animals, including humans. It is the tendency to move in a group or flock, often in response to a perceived threat or danger. This instinct is believed to have evolved as a way to increase the chances of survival in the wild.


Definition: Herding instinct is a natural behavior that is seen in many animals, including humans. It is the tendency to move in a group or flock, often in response to a perceived threat or danger. This instinct is believed to have evolved as a way to increase the chances of survival in the wild.


Examples: Herding instinct can be seen in many animals, such as sheep, cows, horses, and birds. It is also seen in humans, as we often move in groups or crowds when we feel threatened or unsafe.


Effects: Herding instinct can be beneficial in some situations, as it can help animals and humans to stay safe and protect themselves from danger. However, it can also lead to negative effects, such as mob mentality and groupthink. It can also lead to a lack of individual thought and creativity, as people may be more likely to follow the crowd instead of thinking for themselves.


Do you want to expand your knowledge on this topic? Read our full in-depth article on cognitive biases.


Do you have extra 15 minutes today? Takeour fun and interactive quiz to learn which of 16 reasoning styles you use, your overall level of rationality, and what you can do now to improve your rationality skills.

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