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Not-Invented-Here Syndrome: Definition, Examples and Effects

Not-Invented-Here Syndrome (NIH) is a term used to describe a situation in which an organization or individual refuses to use existing solutions or ideas, instead preferring to develop their own. It is a form of organizational behavior that can have a negative impact on productivity and innovation.


Examples of Not-Invented-Here Syndrome


One of the most common examples of Not-Invented-Here Syndrome is when an organization or individual refuses to use existing software or technology solutions, instead opting to develop their own. This can be seen in many organizations that have their own proprietary software or hardware solutions, even when there are existing solutions that could be used. Another example is when an organization or individual refuses to use existing ideas or processes, instead preferring to develop their own.


Effects of Not-Invented-Here Syndrome


Not-Invented-Here Syndrome can have a number of negative effects on an organization or individual. It can lead to increased costs, as developing new solutions or ideas can be expensive. It can also lead to delays in projects, as developing new solutions or ideas can take a long time. Additionally, it can lead to a lack of innovation, as existing solutions or ideas may be more effective than the ones developed in-house. Finally, it can lead to a lack of collaboration, as existing solutions or ideas may be more effective when used in combination with other solutions or ideas.


Do you want to expand your knowledge on this topic? Read our full in-depth article on cognitive biases.


Do you have extra 15 minutes today? Takeour fun and interactive quiz to learn which of 16 reasoning styles you use, your overall level of rationality, and what you can do now to improve your rationality skills.

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